All entries by this author

The Philosophy of Being Co-Active

Mar 25th, 2017 | By

by Ann Betz and Karen Kimsey-House Philosophers have debated the complexities of balance and integration for centuries: yin/yang, light and dark, masculine and feminine. The concepts behind the philosophy of Co-Active aren’t new at all. In fact, being Co-Active might be more aptly described as a modern approach to ancient wisdom that has been largely lost in

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The Psychology behind the Meme

Mar 14th, 2017 | By

by Tim Ward and Teresa Erickson The word meme was coined by philosopher of science Richard Dawkins. In his 1976 book The Selfish Gene he mused about how ideas influence human evolution. Our ideas pass on mental information (“units of culture”) encoded electrically in our brains’ neural networks. Through “survival of the fittest,” the winning

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Obesity and Food Addiction: It’s Not About Willpower

Feb 25th, 2017 | By
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(This article first appeared in the Huffington Post) While it’s nationally recognized that we are in the midst of an “obesity epidemic,” our response remains gravely inadequate. Imagine handling the ebola epidemic by saying to those who contracted the disease, “Try harder not to get sick.” Despite what our culture, exercise and diet industries would

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Striking at the Roots, Mark Hawthorne

Feb 1st, 2017 | By

The power to act for animals – to work for change on behalf of the voiceless – is within all of us. It does not require a vast amount of knowledge, although understanding the abuses animals suffer will make you more effective. Activism does not demand a lot of time, either: you can make a

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Zombies on Kilimanjaro – Tim Ward

Jan 17th, 2017 | By

Impossible to Climb – Arrival: Moshi, Tanzania “Your guide will probably tell you,” Ezekiel said, “that the name Kilimanjaro comes from kilima, the Swahili word for ‘mountain,’ and jaro, the Maasai word for ‘white capped.’ But that’s just for the tourists. We Chagga people who have always lived here, we believe the name comes from

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A New Enlightenment

Dec 28th, 2016 | By

by Rick Smyre and Neil Richardson We are in a transition from an Industrial Society to an Ecological Civilization that will transform the fundamental principles of thinking and organization. Although it took 100 years for the First Enlightenment (1720–1820) to emerge, eventually a phrase appeared amongst the moderate thinkers of the time that personified the

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WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO START HEALING FROM ABUSE?

Dec 21st, 2016 | By

by Carla van Raay Healing from abuse is a topic high on the agenda now that stories of abuse are being revealed almost every day. It is a time for truth to come out that has long been hidden in fear. It is also a time for starting to heal the terrible legacy of abuse

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Responding to the Trauma of the Presidential Election in Four Dimensions

Nov 28th, 2016 | By

by John C. Robinson, Ph.D., D.Min. Introduction The 2016 presidential election triggered an unexpected and nearly unbearable trauma for over half of the American people. For many, it felt like the death of a loved one, or the assassinations of John Kennedy, Martin Luther King, and Robert Kennedy, or the nightmare of 9/11. It felt like

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Self-Limiting Beliefs

Oct 24th, 2016 | By

by Heather Jayne Wynn Throughout the course of your life, mostly when you were growing up, you sucked in information into your subconscious mind just like a sponge sucks up water. You picked up snippets of conversations, comments, media stories, family values and teachings from your family, peers and the people around you, ultimately creating

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10 Ways to Help Rabbits

Oct 5th, 2016 | By

by Mark Hawthorne (First published on Striking at the Roots blog site) Domestic rabbits—cherished for their playful, gentle natures—are skinned for their fur, blinded to test cosmetics, bred for show, drugged for science, clipped for wool products, pulled out of magicians’ hats, killed in vivisection labs, sold as food for pet snakes, and raised and shipped

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